Indianapolis Tattoo Artists

Most Popular Tattoo Styles

American Traditional, Biomechanical, Celtic, Cover Up, Japanese, New School, Photo Realism, Polynesian, Portrait, Watercolor, Script, Floral, Geometric, Black & Grey, 3D, Black & White, Tribal, Animal, Mandala, White Ink, Sacred Geometry, Trash Polka, Vegan

Here are some of the best Indianapolis tattoo artists and shops according to our research. If you think we should add anyone to the list or if you see anything that should be edited, contact us by clicking here

Nicholas “Boat” Lynch

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Sketch

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Laura Black

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Gerrit Verplank

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Mr. Bill

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Free Hand Body Art

Address: 729 N Green St Ste E, Brownsburg, IN 46112

Phone: (317) 852-7777

Tattoo Profile: Free Hand Body Art combines quality piercing and tattooing with a hot rod theme in a clean friendly environment.

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Untitled Ink

Address: 6357 Guilford Ave, Indianapolis, IN 46220

Phone: (317) 251-3465

Tattoo Profile: Untitled Ink was created from a love of custom unique tattoos. We have traveled to see some of the best in the world, and been tattooed by some of them as well. Our mission was to bring that uniqueness and talent to Indiana.

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Brian McNulty

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Kody Richard

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Garrett Hudson

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Beau Guenin

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Enrique Hernandez

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Artistic Skin Designs & Body Piercing

Address:5349 N Keystone Ave, Indianapolis, IN 46220

Phone:(317) 257-8282

Tattoo Profile: At Artistic Skin Designs and Body Piercing, we cater to our clients with a knowledgeable staff, custom designs and the highest quality body jewelry available. With qualified artists and piercers, hospital quality sterilization and competitive pricing, we are sure your experience with us will be a good one.

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Keith Fieler

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Jose Flores

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Steel Rod Tattoo

Address: 3710 Lafayette Rd, Indianapolis, IN 46222

Phone: (317) 297-8335

Tattoo Profile: Our studio offers high quality artwork in a sterile facility. We love to do custom artwork to give our customers a unique experience. Our artists range from portrait style to traditional tattoo artwork. With our artist being very different in personalities we strive to give our valued customers a once in a lifetime experience.

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Metamorphosis

Address: 828 Broad Ripple Avenue, Indianapolis, IN 46256

Phone: (317) 466-1666

Tattoo Profile: Metamorphosis is a full-service tattoo and piercing studio and has been located in the Broad Ripple cultural district of Indianapolis, Indiana since 1998. The concept behind the studio was to create a unique setting with an exceptional staff.

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Carmel Tattoo Ink

Address: 43 W Main St, Carmel, IN 46032

Phone: (317) 571-8282

Tattoo Profile: Our studio is very clean and crisp with very friendly staff eager to help. If you are not sure what you want, but you know you want something, let us help. We love making ideas into works of art.

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Chad Rowe

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Jacob Bryan

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Firefly Tattoo Collective

Address: 429 E Vermont St, Indianapolis, IN 46202

Tattoo Profile: Custom tattoos by educated artists. We offer custom tattoo by appointment only.

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Krist Karloff

Tattoo Styles: Watercolor, Abstract

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Lesley Diane

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Before becoming a state, the piece of land that would later be known as Indiana was a part of the Northwest Territory in addition to areas that are now the states of Wisconsin, Illinois, the western part of Michigan and the east half of Minnesota. At the time, most of the land in this area was wooded. In 1820, a legislature appointed committee chose a part of land that they thought would be suitable to be the capital city and it happened to be a thick, forested area that was at the intersection of Fall Creek and White River. They used specific criteria before picking this location and this included fertile land, access to a navigable river and a location that would be central to the state.

The engineer and surveyor of the land, Alexander Ralston, who had worked with Pierre L’Enfant while he was planning the Washington DC, was picked to design the layout for the city that would be Indianapolis. Ralston had been inspired by the work he’d done with L’Enfant and based off that, he built what was later known as the Mile Square plan which consisted of circle in the middle with four avenues leaving the circle and bisecting a street grid. The circle was 300 square feet and placed on top of a hill filled with sugar maples. Originally, the area was there for the Governor’s House and they allocated other plots of land for three religious institutions, two markets, the Court House and the State House.

In the same way Washington DC is set up, a number of streets were named after different states like the four main avenues named Indiana, Virginia, Massachusetts and Kentucky Avenues. Being aware of the site’s landscape, Ralston planned two streets that were angled and ran parallel to Fall Creek where it ends up meeting up with the southeast section of Indy. Necessities for more space that was open was not something Ralston that was important because of the proximity of the wilderness that was just about half a mile from any part of Indianapolis. On the other hand, green spaces popped up in the city by way of the natural triangular shapes formed by the streets crossing each other.

By the time the 1820’s rolled around, residential lots were starting to be sold in the eastern and northern section of the Mile Square. This was the case because people wanted to be as far away from the lowlands and swamps of Fall Creek, Pogues Run and White River, as they could be. The riverfront area earned a reputation of being a working class area with a great deal of commercial operations while the north side of the city was where the fashionable residential homes were located. Because of where people wanted to live, streets started heading further north out of the central part to accommodate all those that wanted to move away from the wet areas.

National Road was extended to connect from Indiana to the east coast in 1826. It linked with Washington Street which was considered the main commercial road coming into the new city. This was the first major federally funded highway in the U.S. Within a few years, the construction of the road was finished. This gave the area the kind of economic boost that it needed as the city was mostly isolated and new. Indianapolis was a big time stopping point for people moving along the National Road by the 1830’s.

Planning for a central canal would be what was needed to connect the city to other areas in the state and outside Indiana. However, the plans for the canal fell through because of the depression of 1837 and only eight miles of the canal ended up being built. At the same time, where the canal failed, the railroads picked up the slack. On the Ohio River, the train connected Indiana and Madison to Indianapolis in 1847. This is the same year that Indianapolis was officially chartered. Eleven railroads went into Indianapolis in 1870 which made the city an important Civil War staging ground. At this time, the city was growing, and land kept being added to the area outside of the original city because a cemetery and military grounds were needed. Military Park and University Park, amongst others, were some of the first dedicated public spaces and after the war, they became recreational areas.

After the turn of the century, the automobile and streetcar changed the way things were happening and both of these technologies would have impacted Indianapolis. As the people kept filing into the city, neighborhoods were created to keep up with the influx. Public transportation helped in the growth of the city as well. In other areas, automobile moguls like Frank Wheeler, James Allison and Carl Fisher were building their estates in these new suburbs of Indianapolis which brought in well known architects. They also went in together on founding the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Hugh Landon, a prominent business man, built his American Country Place estate called Oldfield, which is now a National Historic Landmark and part of the Indianapolis Museum of Art. The landscape was actually designed by the Olmsted Brothers’ Percival Gallagher and he placed it along the White River which was very remote at the time.

Revitalization

Indianapolis had a period of revitalization in the late 20th century and the early 21st century. The first Greenways Master Plan was put in place in 1994, which seeded to enlarge the parkway system to go past Kessler’s beginning vision of what the city was to look like. Now, there are well over 60 miles of trails in a broad network that almost doubled the infrastructure that was originally built during Sheridan and Kessler’s time. New bike lanes were added in addition to the creation of the Monon and Cultural Trails. This allows easy and quick access to downtown Indianapolis and have been one of the main sources of travel for city residents to get to open public spaces.

Indianapolis, Indiana has a rich tattoo history. Featuring shops such as Metamorphosis, Voluta Tattoo, Artistic Skin Designs INC, and Steel Rod Tattoo, Indianapolis, Indiana is a great destination if you’re looking for some new ink. With a population of around 830,000, there are lots of potential customers for the parlors in town. Yelp currently lists 47 different shops when searching for “tattoo” in Indianapolis, Indiana. Google Places lists 81 different tattoo shops in Indianapolis, which shows how competitive the city truly is. When doing research for your artist, we suggest not paying too much attention to price because quality is much more important when you’re going to be living with the artwork for the rest of your life.

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